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Causes of ME/CFS
 
There are many factors linked with ME/CFS2-8. These include: bacterial, fungal or viral infections, including the Epstein Barr Virus9 and enteroviruses10-13, multiple courses of antibiotics, vaccinations, severe emotional distress, operations, pregnancy and toxin overload. The question is though, what form these links take.
Are the factors causes of ME/CFS or are they associations etc? From the research we have studied2-13 and our experiences with ME/CFS; we believe the relationship is, for the most part, non-causal. It can be observed that when most of the population are exposed to these physiological and psychological demands they do not continue to contract ME/CFS. It therefore follows that there must be some reason why a proportion of people who are exposed to these factors go on to contract ME/CFS and others recover. It is this difference which is critical. It is also worth pointing out that some ME/CFS sufferers slowly develop the condition without the factors mentioned above, which gives further evidence that they might not be as significant as they first appear.

We would surmise the afore mentioned factors in ME/CFS, for the most part, merely precipitate the condition. We believe the impetus behind the disease lies not in the triggers but in the degree of resting stress response; the degree of drive, tension or anxiety a person feels whilst there is little significant external stimulus. Recent scientific hypotheses have corroborated this opinion; suggesting ‘sustained arousal’ (the neurological effect caused by higher than normal resting stress levels) leads to ME/CFS14. And separately ‘HPA axis dysfunction reflects a crash in the stress system’15,16, in addition to, CFS leads from a dysfunction of the HPA axis17. An understanding of the HPA axis and its impact on ME/CFS can be gained from the next section.


* So why do people with ME/CFS have higher than normal resting stress levels?

* Treatments for ME/CFS

 
 
 
 

Latest Research

Central nervous system abnormalities in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: new concepts in treatment.

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Childhood trauma and risk for chronic fatigue syndrome: association with neuroendocrine dysfunction.

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Chronic fatigue syndrome and the central nervous system.

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Immunological aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome.

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Customizing treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia: the role of perpetuating factors.

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Normalization of leaky gut in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is accompanied by a clinical improvement: effects of age, duration of illness and the translocation of LPS from gram-negative bacteria.

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Negative perfectionism increases the risk of fatigue following a period of stress.

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Alternative medical interventions used in the treatment and management of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

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